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College of Arts and Letters


Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity (ISRE)




ISRE Upcoming Events

Caribbean Day

12:00 - 1:30  Webb Center
Poster Presentations: History and Culture of the Caribbean

1:30 - 2:45 - Hampton/Newport News Room
Sankofa: The Legacy of Slavery, Colonization and Economic Development in the Caribbean


 *   Dr. Jelmer A. Vos, Assistant Professor - History Department

 *   Kideste Wilder-Bonner, Lecturer - Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice

 *   Fitzgerald Hinds, Attorney - Hinds and Associates; former Minister of State in the Ministry of National Security and Member of Parliament - Republic of Trinidad and Tobago

The Caribbean populations have been subdued over the past five centuries by a brutal system of social and economic exploitation ? a painful heritage shared by generations of Caribbean?s.  Some scholars hold that while slavery and colonization contributed to the development of Western Capitalism, both systems also contributed to the underdevelopment of the Caribbean region.  The presenters will discuss how the natural resources of the Caribbean transformed the islands into some of the wealthiest places on earth and later how imperialism transformed the islands into some of the poorest places on earth.  The presenters will also highlight the importance of returning to one?s origins to understand the residual and structural effects of imperialism on the Caribbean mind-set in order to come to terms with feeling about being Black and as a holistic method for self-progression.


4:00 - 5:15 - River Rooms
KEYNOTE PRESENTATION: Economic Empowerment in the Caribbean: Challenges and Strengths Ahead


*   The Honorable Donna Cox, Minister of State in the Ministry of National Security and Member of Parliament - Republic of Trinidad and Tobago
*   Fitzgerald Hinds, Attorney - Hinds and Associates; former Minister of State in the Ministry of National Security and Member of Parliament - Republic of Trinidad and Tobago
*   Dr. Ingrid P. Whitaker, Associate Professor - Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice

Once slavery was abolished and the sugar beet became a part of European agriculture, the financial growth of the Caribbean slowed down considerably for more than a century.  In recent times, the rise of tourism has sparked an indirect growth in many other domestic industries such as construction and many other service- and tourism-related enterprises.  As well, the individual economies of the Caribbean islands are generally open to free trade and are beginning to expand their export based and privatize government-controlled industries.  While their export bases are fairly limited, many islands are beginning to diversify their industries as a method to advance economic development.

During this lecture, the presenters will discuss the economic future of the Caribbean and the importance of obtaining developed country status.  Because the Caribbean economy is so closely linked to the performance of the U.S. economy, the presenters will also talk about the importance of the Self-reliance as a development strategy and the necessity of building strong coalitions.


5:15 - 5:45 pm - Foyer of Mills Godwin Building (MGB)
Caribbean Cuisine

5:45 - 7:00 pm - Mills Godwin Building (MGB 102)
ACA Cultural Presentation

7:30 pm 9:30 pm - Mills Godwin Building (MGB 101 & 102)
Office of Intercultural Relations Event - Malaak Compton-Rock